Sunday, June 30, 2013

Southern Skywatch July, 2013 edition is now out!

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Southern horizon at 10:00 pm local time on July 1.

The July edition of Southern Skywatch is now up.

There's still some nice planetary action this month with Jupiter, Mars and Mercury meeting.

Mars climbs higher to the morning sky and is near the crescent Moon on the 7th. It is joined by Jupiter which is close to Mars on 21-24 July.


Mercury returns to the morning sky and is not far from Mars and Jupiter in the last weeks of the Month.

Saturn was at opposition in April, but it is still big and bright this month.  On March 17 the Moon  is close to Saturn.

On the 10th the crescent Moon  is close to Venus.
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Saturday, June 29, 2013

Three Exoplanets in a Habitable Zone? The Gliese 667 C System in Celestia

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Gliese 667 C f (Exoplanet names in triple star systems are confusing) looking back towards it's primary (Gliese 667 C) and the binary it orbits (Cliese 667 A and B). Also visible are several of the other planets in the system. Visualised in Celestia. Click to embiggen.The Gliese 667 C system. I have tilted the orbital plane sightly so that  all three stars in the triple star system can be seen.

Our search for extrasolar planets keeps turning up science-fiction worlds! The latest is a planetery system around one star in a triple star system that hosts not one, but three planets in its habitable zone (c, f [illustrated above] and e).

The Gliese 667 system is well known, lying 22.1 light years away in Scoripius. The system is (just) visible to the unaided eye as a single dot of magnitude 5.9 (see image of Scorpius to the left, the Gliese system is circled, click to embiggen).

We already knew that there were three planets around Gliese 667, but longer data collection and reanalysis found more of them.

While there is a lot of to-do about habitable zones, it simply means the zone where liquid water can exists on a planets  surface. Other factors may be involved in habitability too. Mars is in our habitable zone, but was too small to hold on to a substantial atmosphere, and is now a freezing desert.  The M star these planets revolve around is potentially a flare star, with powerful solar eruptions that may make life difficult on these planets. We also don't know if they are rocky worlds of water worlds.

Still, the growing inventory of stars with terrestrial style planets in their habitable zones suggests that the possibility of life on other worlds is not remote.



The ESO press release is here, and nice backgrounders from the Universe Today and Space.com. Once again I've made Celestia files for the system.

As usual, copy the data here to a plain text file (GJ667.ssc), copy the file to the Celestia extras folder. Celestia already has Gliese 667 triple star system, so you don't need to have a star definition file. The images you get from Celestia look a bit different to the artists interpretations in the press release, in part because of the way the stars and planets are rendered in Celestia, and in part because of how the stars orbit is defined. But it will still give you a good feel fro the system.

I'll have to update my Celestia Exoplanet Tour as well.

===============GJ1667.stc======================================
"b" "Gliese 667 C"

# Neptune like world
# All data from original paper http://www.eso.org/public/archives/releases/sciencepapers/eso1328/eso1328a.pdf

{
    Texture "exo-class4.*"
    NightTexture "exo-class4night.*"


Mass 5.94 # M.sin(i) = 5.94 Earth
Radius 12181.98 # 1.91 Earth radii, guess

#InfoURL "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gliese_667_Cb"

EllipticalOrbit {
Period 0.019713845
SemiMajorAxis 0.050432
Eccentricity 0.112
ArgOfPericenter 267 #guess
Inclination 30 #greater than 30 actually, but no clear figure
#MeanAnomaly 271
}

# likely to be in captured synchronous rotation
}

AltSurface "limit of knowledge" "Gliese 667 C/b"
{
    Texture "extrasolar-lok.*"

}

"c" "Gliese 667 C"

# Venus-like world maybe, on edge of habitable zone

{
Texture "venussurface.*"
# Using venus although it may be a water world


Mass 3.9 # M.sin(i) = 3.9 Earth
Radius 11480.4 # 1.8 Earth radi, from paper

#InfoURL "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gliese_667_Cc"

EllipticalOrbit {
Period 0.076995587
SemiMajorAxis 0.12507
Eccentricity 0.001
ArgOfPericenter 267 #guess
Inclination 30
#MeanAnomaly 271
}

}

AltSurface "limit of knowledge" "Gliese 667 C/c"
{
Texture "extrasolar-lok.*"
}

"d" "Gliese 667 C"

# Neptune like world

{
    Texture "exo-class4.*"
    NightTexture "exo-class4night.*"


Mass 10.4 # M.sin(i) = 10.4 Earth
Radius 17539.5 # 2.75 Earth radii, guess

#InfoURL "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gliese_667_Cd"

EllipticalOrbit {
Period 0.252131656
SemiMajorAxis 0.2758
Eccentricity 0.19
ArgOfPericenter 267 #guess
Inclination 30
#MeanAnomaly 271
}

# likely to be in captured synchronous rotation
}

AltSurface "limit of knowledge" "Gliese 667 C/d"
{
    Texture "extrasolar-lok.*"
}

"e" "Gliese 667 C"

# earth like world

{
Texture "venussurface.*"
# Using venus although it may be a perfectly earth-like world


Mass 2.68 # M.sin(i) = 2.68 Earth, upper limit of theoretical range
Radius 9567 # 1.5 Earth radii,

#InfoURL "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gliese_667_Ce"

EllipticalOrbit {
Period 0.170471395
SemiMajorAxis 0.212
Eccentricity 0.001
ArgOfPericenter 267 #guess
Inclination 30
#MeanAnomaly 271
}

}

AltSurface "limit of knowledge" "Gliese 667 C/e"
{
Texture "venussurface.*"
OverlayTexture "ganymede-lok-mask.png"
}

"f" "Gliese 667 C"

# earth like world

{
    Texture "ganymede.*"
    # Using Ganymede as it may be giant water world
        # NightTexture "gasgiantnight.jpg"


Mass 1.94 # M.sin(i) = 1.94 Earth theoretical maximum
Radius 9567 # 1.5 Earth radii,

#InfoURL "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gliese_667_Cf"

EllipticalOrbit {
Period 0.106998653
SemiMajorAxis 0.15575
Eccentricity 0.001
ArgOfPericenter 267 #guess
Inclination 30
#MeanAnomaly 271
}

}

AltSurface "limit of knowledge" "Gliese 667 C/f"
{
    Texture "ganymede.*"
    OverlayTexture "ganymede-lok-mask.png"
}

"g" "Gliese 667 C"

# Neptune like world
# All data from original paper

{
    Texture "exo-class4.*"
    NightTexture "exo-class4night.*"


Mass 4.41 # M.sin(i) = 4.41 Earth
Radius 12181.98 # 1.91 Earth radii, guess

#InfoURL "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gliese_667_Cg"

EllipticalOrbit {
Period 0.68861018
SemiMajorAxis 0.5389
Eccentricity 0.107
ArgOfPericenter 267 #guess
Inclination 30 #greater than 30 actually, but no clear figure
#MeanAnomaly 271
}

# likely to be in captured synchronous rotation
}

AltSurface "limit of knowledge" "Gliese 667 C/g"
{
    Texture "extrasolar-lok.*"

}
============================end========================
[Continue reading...]

Aurora Happening NOW!!! (Saturday 29 June)

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There are confirmed aurora from Tasmania (Sandy Bay, Cygnet, Bicheno, Wynyard) and Southern Victoria, Bz is -11 nT, K index 6 and the Australian IPS has issued an aurora alert. People in Tasmania, Southern Victoria and Southern New Zealand should go out and look now, reports are that the aurora are fading in and out, but if you find a dark sky spot, and let your eyes adapt, if you look to the south you may see shifting glows and pillars of light. Some displays are reported to be spectacular.

Australian Region Estimated K-Index Map
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Thursday, June 27, 2013

Carnival of Space #307 is Here!

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Carnival of Space #307 is now up at Links Through Space. There's Finnish Solargraphy, starship designs, the Arkyd Space Telescope, Thierry Legault's amazing shots of Shenzhou 10 and much, much more. Head on over and have a read.
[Continue reading...]

Tuesday, June 25, 2013

The Sky This Week - Thursday June 27 to Thursday July 4

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The Last Quarter Moon is Sunday June 30, this is a "Blue" Last Quarter Moon. Mars rises in the morning twilight. Venus and Mercury pull apart in the evening twilight. Saturn is high in the evening skies.

The Last Quarter Moon is Sunday June 30, this is a "Blue" Last Quarter Moon. That means it is the second Last Quarter Moon of the Month (the first was on the 1st of June). While not as deeply entrenched in our mental mythology as  "Blue" full Moons, they are still nice to think about.

Evening sky looking west as seen from Adelaide at 18:00 pm local time on Saturday June 29. Venus and Mercury have drawn apart. Similar views will be seen elsewhere at the equivalent local times.  Click to embiggen.

Venus and Mercury draw apart during the week.

Jupiter is lost in the twilight, although technically it enters the morning twilight at the end if this week, it will be hard t see until next week..  

Mercury  is visible below Venus and continues to lower towards the horizon.


Venus  climbs higher in the evening twilight. It can be seen 20 minutes after sunset and is now reasonably easy to see up to an hour and a half after sunset.

Saturn is easily visible above the north-eastern horizon in the early evening in the constellation of Libra. By 10 pm local time it is high above the northern-western horizon and very easy to see.This is an excellent time to view this planet in a small telescope, as there will be the little interference from horizon murk and air turbulence (and you can show the kids before they go to bed). At the start of the week Saturn is half a finger-width from the dim star Kappa Virginis, and is closest on July 1.

Saturn, Arcturus and Spica from a broad triangle above the northern-western horizon.

Opposition (when Saturn is biggest and brightest as seen from Earth) was on April 28. However, Saturn will be a worthwhile evening target for telescopes of any size for several months. The sight of this ringed world is always amazing.


Morning sky on Thursday July 4 looking north-east as seen from Adelaide at 6:45 am local time in South Australia. Mars is below the red star Aldebaran in the twilight. Similar views will be seen elsewhere at the equivalent local time (click to embiggen).


Mars rises in the twilight, but will still be hard to see unless you have a flat, clear horizon. It forms a triangle with two red giant stars, Aldebaran and Betelgeuse.

 
There are lots of interesting things in the sky to view with a telescope. Especially with Saturn so prominent in the sky.  If you don't have a telescope, now is a good time to visit one of your local astronomical societies open nights or the local planetariums. Especially during the school holidays.

Printable PDF maps of the Eastern sky at 10 pm AEST, Western sky at 10 pm AEST. For further details and more information on what's up in the sky, see Southern Skywatch.

Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.
[Continue reading...]

Monday, June 24, 2013

Post Perigee Moon (Super Moon), 24 June, 2013

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Just past Full Moon on June 24, 2012 at roughly 8:30 pm as seen from Adelaide (click to embiggen).

While I missed out on Sundays Perigee Moon ( the so called "Super Moon") due to cloud (shakes fist at sky), tonight I was able to see the just-past-perigee Moon.

After, of course, clouds blanked out Venus and Mercury again. And prevented me from doing anything artistic with the rising Moon.

Anyway, this is a single image taken using infinity to infinity focussing, with my Canon IXUS (ASA 400, 1/500th second exposure) through my 20 mm lens with my 4" Newtonian. I've done an unsharp mask and increased the contrast a bit as the only processing. I tried to stack 5 images in Registax, but I couldn't get them to register (sigh). Still, not too bad if I say so myself.


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Sunday, June 23, 2013

Talking about the ISS to the Australian Air League

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On Friday night I gave a talk to the SA branch of the Australian Air League. The Air League is a bit like Scouts, only with an aviation/avionic theme. They have their 80th anniversary coming up, and have applied to speak to the astronauts of the International Space Station.

So that was where I came in, to give a talk that would give a wider introduction to the ISS and what the astronauts did. I divided my talk into the history and structure of the ISS, what science is being done on the ISS, school student participation in the ISS (did you know there was a LEGO-ISS collaboration to demonstrate how to build useful structures in microgravity), how to see the ISS for yourself and finally, what question would you ask a ISS astronaut.

Preparation: I knew I was going to be giving a talk to a group of kids of differing ages and differing exposures to the ISS, I was sure some would have even more knowledge than me. So to start off with, I made a short occasionally humorous quiz about the ISS. As well as establishing the kids base knowledge, this would also break the ice and  make the session more interactive, instead of me just being a talking head.

Preparation 1: I downloaded all the videos, embedded them, made sure they were in the same directory in the memory stick, tested the assembly on 2 different computers to make sure the animations worked. I exported the powerpoint in two different versions in case the laptop could only work with older powerpoints, I even exported the whole thing to PDF just in case neither power point presentation worked. I also made a copy onto CD in case the flash drive died.

Preparation 2: I printed off a bunch of starmaps, so I could show the kids how to use star maps when looking for the ISS, I printed out a handout with all the links I used in the presentation to ISS prediction sites, star-maps and free photo manipulation software, and a bunch of make a paper ISS sheets.

So how did it go? Fantastic! The kids (and kids at heart), were eager, engaged with lots of interesting questions. The "what would you ask an astronaut" session came up with some pretty good ideas such as  "does time go faster on the ISS". Also, a jam biscuit makes a good prop for discussing protostellar dust disks.

What didn't work so well? The weather didn't cooperate, so I couldn't do a live demonstration of the star-map use (I wasn't actually counting on it, and there were no ISS passes that night anyway). Despite extensive testing, the embedded videos didn't run in the powerpoint (I was able to run one later independently, then I ran out of time). I didn't print off enough ISS models (but that's because I ran out of ink printing them). I let the kids questions run on a bit too long (but on the other hand they were just so enthusiastic, it seemed a shame to rein them in).

The next time I do something like this, I'll cut down on the slides so the kids can do more. Spend a bit more time on the hands-on, how to image the ISS yourself. And break out to stand alone videos rather than try and run them in power-point.

Despite the glitches, it still went very well, more due to the kids than me. I had a great time (and it certainly looked like the kids had a great time). I really hope they get to speak to the ISS astronauts, they truly deserve it.
[Continue reading...]

No "Super Moon" for Me

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No perigee Moon for me (inaccurately known as a "Super Moon").

Thick, orgulous cloud has cloaked the heavens, knocking out the Moon and Venus and Mercury close together.

A few hopeful gaps in the cloud allowed us to go to the beach, where we stood in howling wind and drizzle crashing kites into the ground at high speed. sadly, these gaps in the cloud have not translated into anything useful astronomically.

At least I get to stay inside near the heater.
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Tuesday, June 18, 2013

The Sky This Week - Thursday June 20 to Thursday June 27

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Earth is at solstice on Friday June 21. The Full Moon is Sunday June 23. At this time it will be closer to Earth than any other time this year (a so called "Super Moon"). Mars rises in the morning twilight. Venus and Mercury are close together in the evening twilight. Saturn is high in the evening skies. The Moon occults the bright star alpha Librae 2 on the 20th.

The Full Moon is Sunday June 23. At this time the Moon will be at perigee, when it is closest to the Earth. This is the closest perigee for 2013 at 356989 km. A full Moon at perigee has been called a "SuperMoon", this is not an astronomical term, but an astrological one. While the Moon is close, it will have no real effect (or be distinguishable without a telescope and a good memory).

The Moon at Perigee and apogee as seen through a telescope. With the unaided eye, the Moon only appears half a finger-width wide, so the difference is much harder to see.

This months Full Moon could appear up to 14% bigger and 30% brighter in the sky than average. But will you actually notice if it is different to the last Full Moon? The limit of distances that someone with good vision can distinguish between is 1 minute of arc (about the width of a human hair). So, for the vast majority of people any difference smaller than 1 minute of arc cannot be seen.

The Moon this Full Moon will be 33'57" wide (just a touch over half a degree, around half a finger-width wide), last months Full Moon (358374 km) was 33'47" wide. Without a telescope and careful astrophotography you will not notice the difference.


If you can wait until January the 16th 2014, when the Full Moon is at Apogee, then it’s diameter will be 29'32" , and you could notice a difference if you have a good memory, but it won’t be spectacular. The illustration above is from November 28, 2012, when the Moon was at apogee and  29'33" wide when it was 406364 km from Earth

However, while the "SuperMoon" will not be spectacular, it will be a good photo opportunity, if you have a decent zoom on your camera, taking a photo of the Moon on June 23 and then again on January 16 2014 you will see a decent difference (you need to use exactly the same zoom enlargement, see Inconstant Moon for instructions).

The evening sky facing east in Sydney on June 20 at 5:05 pm AEST showing the waxing Moon just about to cover alpha2 Librae. (similar views will be seen from other locations at a similar local time eg 5:08 AEST Canberra). The inset shows a telescopic view of the Moon at 5:05 pm AEST, with alpha2 Librae about to go behind the Moon.

The waxing Moon passes in front of the bright alpha2 Librae in the constellation of Libra on the evening of June 20. Alpha2 Librae is a bright white star readily visible to the unaided eye (magnitude 2.8). The occultation will be seen from eastern Australia and South Australia. Everywhere else will see a nice, close approach.

From Adelaide the star reappears from the bright limb at 17:23 ACST. From Brisbane the star reappears at 18:05 AEST (the disappearance behind the dark limb is too deep in the twilight to be really seen).

From Canberra the star disappears behind the dark limb of the Moon at 17:08 AEST, and reappears at 18:08 AEST. From Hobart the star disappears behind the dark limb of the Moon at 17:28 AEST, and reappears at 18:07 AEST.

From Melbourne the star disappears behind the dark limb of the Moon at 17:13 AEST, and reappears at 18:03 AEST. From Sydney the star disappears behind the dark limb of the Moon at 17:06 AEST, and reappears at 18:10 AEST.

With the Moon not far from Full, this event is really best seen with binoculars or a small telescope (especially for the reappearance of the star on the bright limb of the Moon). If you have a tripod or other stand for your binoculars, it will be much easier to observe. Set up about half an hour before the occultation to watch the star dissapear (so you are not mucking around with equipment at the last moment).
 


Evening sky looking west as seen from Adelaide at 18:00 pm local time on Friday June 21. Venus and Mercury are closest at this time. Similar views will be seen elsewhere at the equivalent local times.  Click to embiggen.

Venus and Mercury come close together this week. From the 20th-23rd they are no further than two finger-widths from each other. On the 21st they are closest, being only a finger-width apart.

Jupiter is lost in the twilight, it is in conjunction with the Sun on June 20.  

Mercury  is visible above Venus but slowly lowers towards the horizon.


Venus  climbs higher in the evening twilight, and catches up to Mercury this week. It is now reasonably easy easier to see up to an hour and a half after sunset.

Saturn is easily visible above the eastern horizon in the early evening in the constellation of Libra. By 10 pm local time it is high above the northern-western horizon and very easy to see.This is an excellent time to view this planet in a small telescope, as there will be the little interference from horizon murk and air turbulence (and you can show the kids before they go to bed). By the end of the week Saturn is half a finger-width from the dim star Kappa Virginis.

Saturn, Arcturus and Spica from a broad triangle above the northern-western horizon.

Opposition (when Saturn is biggest and brightest as seen from Earth) was on April 28. However, Saturn will be a worthwhile evening target for telescopes of any size for several months. The sight of this ringed world is always amazing.


Morning sky on Sunday June 23 looking north-east as seen from Adelaide at 6:45 am local time in South Australia. Mars is below the red star Aldebaran in the twilight. Similar views will be seen elsewhere at the equivalent local time (click to embiggen).


Mars rises in the twilight, but will still be hard to see unless you have a flat, clear horizon. It forms a triangle with two red giant stars, Aldebaran and Betelgeuse.

 
There are lots of interesting things in the sky to view with a telescope. Especially with Saturn so prominent in the sky.  If you don't have a telescope, now is a good time to visit one of your local astronomical societies open nights or the local planetariums. Especially during the school holidays.

Printable PDF maps of the Eastern sky at 10 pm AEST, Western sky at 10 pm AEST. For further details and more information on what's up in the sky, see Southern Skywatch.

Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.
[Continue reading...]

Monday, June 17, 2013

The "Super Moon" of June 23, 2013

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The Full Moon is Sunday June 23 in Australia. At this time the Moon will be at perigee, when it is closest to the Earth. This is the closest perigee for 2013 at 356989 km. A full Moon at perigee has been called a "Super Moon", this is not an astronomical term, but an astrological one (see also here). While the Moon is close, it will have no real effect (or be distinguishable without a telescope and a good memory).

The Moon at Perigee and apogee as seen through a telescope. With the unaided eye, the Moon only appears half a finger-width wide, so the difference is much harder to see.

This months Full Moon could appear up to 14% bigger and 30% brighter in the sky than average. But will you actually notice if it is different to the last Full Moon?

The limit of distances that someone with good vision can distinguish between is 1 minute of arc (about the width of a human hair). So, for the vast majority of people any difference smaller than 1 minute of arc cannot be seen.

The Moon this Full Moon will be 33'57" wide (just a touch over half a degree, around half a finger-width wide), last months Full Moon (358374 km) was 33'47" wide. Without a telescope and careful astrophotography you will not notice the difference. For a list of full/new Moons and the dates of apogee/perigee see here.

If you can wait until January the 16th 2014, when the Full Moon is at Apogee, then it’s diameter will be 29'32" , and you could notice a difference if you have a good memory, but it won’t be spectacular. The illustration above is from November 28, 2012, when the Moon was at apogee and  29'33" wide when it was 406364 km from Earth.

However, while the "SuperMoon" will not be spectacular, it is still pretty and will be a good photo opportunity. If you have a decent zoom on your camera, after taking a photo of the Moon on June 23 and then again on January 16 2014 you will see a decent difference (you need to use exactly the same zoom enlargement, see Inconstant Moon for instructions).

And, no, we will not get earthquakes from the "Super Moon".
[Continue reading...]

Carnival of Space #306 is Here!

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Carnival of Space #306 is now up at the Urban Astronomer. There is a Black Hole Bonanza, science outreach in libraries, Martian Streambeds, robotics for space development and more! Clank on over and have a read.
[Continue reading...]

Occultation of alpha2 Librae (Zubenelgenubi) by the Moon, June 20, 2013

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The evening sky facing east in Sydney on June 20 at 5:05 pm AEST showing the waxing Moon just about to cover alpha2 Librae (Zubenelgenubi). (similar views will be seen from other locations at a similar local time eg 5:08 AEST Canberra). The inset shows a telescopic view of the Moon at 5:05 pm AEST, with alpha2 Librae about to go behind the Moon.

The waxing Moon passes in front of the bright alpha2 Librae in the constellation of Libra on the evening of June 20. Alpha2 Librae, which rejoices in the name Zubenelgenubi, is a bright white star readily visible to the unaided eye (magnitude 2.8). The occultation will be seen from eastern Australia and South Australia. Everywhere else will see a nice, close approach. Appearance and disappearance times are shown in the table below.

CityDisappears Dark LimbReappears Bright Limb
Adelaide-17:23 ACST
Brisbane-18:05 AEST
Canberra17:08 AEST18:08 AEST
Darwin-1deg at twilight
Hobart17:28 AEST18:07 AEST
Melbourne17:13 AEST18:03 AEST
Sydney17:06 AEST18:10 AEST
Perth-1deg at twilight

 With the Moon not far from Full (23 June), this event is really best seen with binoculars or a small telescope (especially for the reappearance of the star on the bright limb of the Moon). If you have a tripod or other stand for your binoculars, it will be much easier to observe. Set up about half an hour before the occultation to watch the star dissapear (so you are not mucking around with equipment at the last moment).
[Continue reading...]

Sunday, June 16, 2013

Don't Forget CosmoQuest Hang-out-a-thon on Now!

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The CosmoQuest Hangout-a-thon is on now! just to remind you:
Faced with governmental funding cuts to science education and research, we have decided to go old school with a twist: On June 15-16, we are hosting a telethon using Google Hangout on Air – a Hangout-a-thon – to raise money to support public engagement in science.
If you want to be part of this awesome hangout here's where you find out more.
- Blog post: http://bit.ly/18U733k
- Schedule of Events: http://bit.ly/15VFNgv
- FB Event: http://on.fb.me/15VNyTD


And you can donate here http://cosmoquest.org/blog/2013/06/24-hour-hangout-a-thon/

[Continue reading...]

Venus and Mercury, June 16, 2013

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Venus and Mercury as seen from Largs Bay, Adelaide on 16 June at 5:50 ACST. This was taken with my Canon IXUS at  ASA 400 and 0.4 of a second exposure. You will need to click to embiggen to see Mercury in this shot.Venus and Mercury as seen from Largs Bay, Adelaide on 16 June at 5:55 ACST. This was taken with my Canon IXUS at 3x Zoom, ASA 400 and 0.6 of a second exposure. Unfortunately the dust on the CCD chip ruins the picture a bit. The colours were more vivid in real life.

 After more cloud finally got a view of Venus and Mercury together. they are closing in on Each other and will be closest on the 22nd. Venus is really quite easy to see now.
[Continue reading...]

Saturday, June 15, 2013

Wallpaper For Free Download Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013

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Wallpaper For Free Download Biography

Source:-Google.com.pk
Desktop wallpaper is the image that fills the background of your computer screen when all programs are closed. Some people choose to leave the desktop blank, filling it only with a color. Others use one of the default backgrounds provided by the operating system, such as a logo, a stock photograph, or an abstract design. But many people prefer to make custom desktop wallpaper from personal pictures or images found online.

To customize your computer you can make your own desktop wallpaper from personal photographs. Navigate to the folder where your digital photographs are stored and right-click on any graphics file to see a pop-up menu. Choose Preview for a slide-show window to cycle through the photographs in the folder. When you find the picture you want to use as your desktop wallpaper, right-click on it and choose set as desktop background.

An image that is tiled is placed on the desktop much like tiles are placed in a shower or a tiled floor. Tiling is commonly used for patterns instead of photos because a pattern is one square image that repeats itself across and down the screen, effectively forming a single image.


Wallpaper For Free Download Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Wallpaper For Free Download Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Wallpaper For Free Download Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Wallpaper For Free Download Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
 Wallpaper For Free Download Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Wallpaper For Free Download Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Wallpaper For Free Download Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Wallpaper For Free Download Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Wallpaper For Free Download Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Wallpaper For Free Download Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Wallpaper For Free Download Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
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Free Download Mobile Wallpaper Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013

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Free Download Mobile Wallpaper Biography

Source:-Google.com.pk
Wallpaper is the monitor pattern or picture or other graphic representation that forms the background onto which all the icons, menus and other elements of the operating system are displayed and moved around. An operating system will typically come with pre-installed images to set as the wallpaper and will also allow users to install their own images to be used as the wallpaper. The wallpaper always stays in the background, and all work is done on top of the wallpaper.

A mobile wallpaper is a computer wallpaper sized to fit a mobile device such as a mobile phone, personal digital assistant or digital.

Mobile Wallpaper is used to decorate mobile screen. Mobile wallpapers are sized according to mobile screen which depends on mobile resolution.
Wallpapers can be downloaded from internet or computer through a data cable.

Regardless of the kind of phone that you own, you can easily download high resolution wallpaper that have been resized and cropped to fit your phone’s screen. You can save image to your computer and then transfer it to your phone.


Free Download Mobile Wallpaper Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Free Download Mobile Wallpaper Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Free Download Mobile Wallpaper Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
FreeDownload Mobile Wallpaper Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Free Download Mobile Wallpaper Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
 Free Download Mobile Wallpaper Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Free Download Mobile Wallpaper Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Free Download Mobile Wallpaper Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Free Download Mobile Wallpaper Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Free Download Mobile Wallpaper Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Free Download Mobile Wallpaper Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013



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Thursday, June 13, 2013

Window 7 Wallpaper Free Download Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013

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Window 7 Wallpaper Free Download Biography

Source:-Google.com.pk
Formerly codenamed Blackcomb, then Vienna, Windows 7 is the next operating system by Microsoft after Vista. Everytime when an operating system is launch, one thing aside from the functionality that excite us are the wallpapers.
To celebrate the arriving of this new operating system fan boys and enthusiasts created related wallpapers and shared them all over the Internet.
To get a desktop background (wallpaper) click Get it now, right-click the image, and then click Set as background.
If you are running Windows 7 in you personal computer and if you are a huge fan of windows 7 and always searching all around how to adjust or replace your boring windows 7 wallpapers, then you’ll find out this post very helpful. To help save your lot of time searching here and there for wonderful and amazing High Quality Windows 7 Wallpapers, we collected top wonderful and amazing HD Windows 7 Wallpapers to spice up your Personal computer desktop.


Window 7 Wallpaper Free Download Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Window 7 Wallpaper Free Download Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Window 7 Wallpaper Free Download Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Window 7 Wallpaper Free Download Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Window 7 Wallpaper Free Download Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Window 7 Wallpaper Free Download Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Window 7 Wallpaper Free Download Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Window 7 Wallpaper Free Download Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Window 7 Wallpaper Free Download Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Window 7 Wallpaper Free Download Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Window 7 Wallpaper Free Download Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013


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Screensavers Free Downloads Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013

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Screensavers Free Downloads Biography

Source:-Google.com.pk
A screensaver is a computer program that blanks the screen or fills it with moving images or patterns when the computer is not in use. Initially designed to prevent phosphor burn-in on CRT and plasma computer monitors, screensavers are now used primarily for entertainment, security or to display system status information.
Decades before the first computers utilizing this technology were invented, Robert A. Heinlein gave an example of how they might be used in his novel Stranger In A Strange Land (1961).
Many modern television systems, media players and other entertainment systems have a form of screensaver integrated. Most simply display a logo moving around the screen.

One increasingly popular application is for screensavers to activate a useful background task, such as a virus scan (for example, Avast comes with this feature, and it shows a screensaver [from your computer, you can choose it] with an overlaying blue window showing the progress. If a virus is detected, the window turns red and the scan is stopped, and the alert is shown once you exit the screensaver) or a distributed computing application .This allows applications to use resources only when the computer would be otherwise idle.

Screensaver software can also be used as a rudimentary security measure. Many screensavers can be configured to ask users for a password before permitting the user to resume work. However, a user might be able to circumvent the password by restarting the computer if the computer's owner has set their account to automatically log in upon startup


Screensavers Free Downloads Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Screensavers Free Downloads Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Screensavers Free Downloads Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Screensavers Free Downloads Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Screensavers Free Downloads Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Screensavers Free Downloads Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Screensavers Free Downloads Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Screensavers Free Downloads Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Screensavers Free Downloads Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Screensavers Free Downloads Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
Screensavers Free Downloads Images Photos Pictures Wallpapers 2013
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